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1933 INVICTA High Chassis with tourer body by Corsica                                     Meadows 6 cylinder 4500cc. 4 speed with overdrive 

 

History:  

This is a rare car indeed. In the 1930's Invicta was one of the most expensive and desirable cars of English origin. They were originally built in Cobham by Noel Macklin who wanted to produce a car "with the most wonderful performance in the World" Most people who have driven one of these 4.5 litre masterpieces would admit that he pulled it off.

This car is one of about 200 high chassis cars and one of only three built and two remaining with this particular very attractive tourer body by Corsica. I am informed that this was the last A type Invicta built at the Flood Street Works in Chelsea. 

The last owner purchased this car in 1969 in Cyprus were it had resided since at least 1940 possibly earlier. The car had a seized engine so was fitted with a temporary replacement- a 3 litre Humber Snipe engine. Some minor repairs were carried out to the body and the car was re-trimmed and repainted.

 

In 1971 the owner was moving back to England and decided to drive the car back. What an adventure! 

 

 The car was in storage for a considerable length of time before that same owner then set about a lengthy and thorough rebuild of the whole car. He rebuilt the original engine and reunited that and the gearbox to the car. The body was stripped right down to the frame and repaired and restored. It was repainted and re-trimmed; including the hood, side screens and tonneau.  It seems it took till around 2005 to complete the project. The rebuild was extensively documented complete with correspondence, technical drawings and invoices. He also devised a detailed service chart that he used to keep a record of the maintenance .

This same owner spent years researching the history of the car and there is another huge file of letters and early photographs which makes fascinating reading. 

In 2009 when the car was restored and had covered 2000 miles the owner and his wife set off on a 1250 mile round trip to the Isle of Mull. The purpose of the trip was to show the newly restored car to the man he had purchased it from at Lagoudera Monastery in Cyprus way back in 1969

He described -" Motoring in this highland region, with long winding hills surrounded by snow clad mountains, shows the Invicta off to it's best advantage: superb comfortable touring, with excellent braking and tractability. Simply a dream" 

Having driven the car myself I totally agree. It is a superb example of 1930's motoring. All the power you could wish for in a very comfortable chassis and extremely handsome coachwork. It is light on the steering and has an easy gear change topped off with the addition of overdrive giving relaxed touring even in modern traffic. 

To sum up; here is a large pre-war 4 seat tourer with its original and flamboyant coachwork, it's original engine and gearbox restored some years ago to a high standard and now tried and thoroughly tested in the hands of the same owner since 1969. 

In my opinion this car is in the higher echelons of pre-war car design. It has all the qualities you could wish for. Performance, style, rarity, and with the Low Chassis S Type Invicta as a sibling there is no doubt it comes from one of the best stables in the country. 

£135,000